Laughter Yoga is a modern exercise involving prolonged voluntary laughter. When you start laughing, your chemistry changes, your physiology changes, your chances to experience happiness are much greater. Join us and prepare your body and mind for happiness.
In swirls of gas and dust, planets are being born. So-called protoplanetary discs whirl around a central star, with the potential to one day form into a solar system like ours. Using high-resolution images of outer space and computer modeling, astronomer Farzana Meru takes you on a wondrous journey to explore the birth and evolution of planets.
Almost every year the Nyando River in western Kenya breaks its banks and nearby residents are forced to cope with massive flooding. Entire towns are submerged and precious crops are washed away. In April 2017, catastrophic floods swept through Kenya displacing hundreds of thousands of people, many of whom were forced into makeshift refugee camps. But is the annual deluge a natural disaster or a man-made catastrophe? A film by Samuel Waweru & Humphrey Odhiambo.
Basket Full of Love: A program by the Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) of Tanzania and Zambia, highlights home activities by young members of the Jamat wherein, they express love and care for their loved ones. Such interactions promote their bonding and foster emotional development.
Almost every year the Nyando River in western Kenya breaks its banks and nearby residents are forced to cope with massive flooding. Entire towns are submerged and precious crops are washed away. In April 2017, catastrophic floods swept through Kenya displacing hundreds of thousands of people, many of whom were forced into makeshift refugee camps. But is the annual deluge a natural disaster or a man-made catastrophe? A film by Samuel Waweru & Humphrey Odhiambo.
Finding our new normal with Femida Hirji is an opportunity for parents to consider how to structure the days and weeks ahead to enable all our needs to be met as families.
Have you ever received a link on WhatsApp or read an article on Facebook and shared it without knowing if it was actually true? We receive information and news through a variety of media, but how do you know if it is true or not? This session will shed light on what it means to be media literate and explain why this is more important than ever. Panelists will share practical tools to help us learn how to separate facts from fiction and become more discerning media consumers.
Between 1990 and 2010, Burundi lost 40.5% of its forest cover, a result of illegal cutting of trees for charcoal production. Charcoal burning is big business in a country that depends almost entirely on this inexpensive fuel for cooking but the long-term consequences of Burundi’s deforestation will be dire: it is anticipated that by 2040 all of Burundi’s forest will be gone. A film by Aimée Nshimirimana.
In today's journey of Muslim Intellectuals, we introduce Al Muayyad fid din al-Shirazi and Nizari Kohistani. Let's understand the reason they're recognized as among the great Muslim intellectuals and get inspired.
The Women's Activities Portfolio, Tanzania brings you a new Chat over Chai session. Join Nutaila Hirji of the Women's Activities Portfolio for Tanzania who speaks to Educational Psychologist, Tahseen Shariff who delves into understanding a child's learning potential and how parents can support their children through their developmental milestones.
The Grevy’s zebra (also known as the imperial zebra) population has declined faster than that of any other African mammal, falling from 15,000 in the 1970s to just 2,350 today. Only half of Grevy’s zebra live in protected areas. So what will save this majestic zebra from extinction? This film follows the efforts of dedicated local residents who have volunteered to work as community scouts and ambassadors for the Grevy’s and to address the threats they face. The film also profiles the bi-annual census conducted by the Grevy’s Zebra Trust. A film by Simon Mukalla.
The proposed 1,000 megawatt coal-fired power plant in Kenya's remote Lamu county would have severely impacted the people and environment of this pristine region, but it's just been defeated in Kenya's courts. It's a great victory for scientific truth and community activism, primarily organized by the Save Lamu coalition. But will this ruling stand the test of time? Find out more from NTV's Dennis Okari and Robert Gichira and GNV's executive producer Andrew Tkach. A film by Dennis Okari & Robert Gichira (co-produced with NTV).
In the dramatic conclusion of End of the River investigative reporter John-Allan Namu tries to find out who was behind the attacks and killings in Laikipia. Is the violence in Laikipia a sign of things to come in the era of climate change? The series also talks to those trying to find a solution to the crisis, and for the people caught between a drying landscape and a brutal competition for diminishing resources. A film by Sam Munia and John-Allan Namu.
In part 3 of a 6-part series on maximizing your potential, author and cancer survivor, Munira Premji talks with Leila Rahemtulla, management consultant and author about the skills needed to build resilience (the ability to manage challenges and setbacks when things don't go as planned).
In Part 3 of a 4-part series, Kenyan investigative journalists from Africa Uncensored track their way through a vicious conflict to the heart of the drought problem: a dire search for grass that led pastoralists from the banks of the Ewaso Nyiro River into restive Laikipia County. The conflicts pitted nomadic cattle herders against landowners, ranchers, and the police. A film by Sam Munia and John-Allan Namu.
Most of us must have heard the names of Ibn e Sina and Ibn e Rushd. But do you know who they really were and what they actually did? Why are they still remembered and valued today among the greatest intellectuals of this world? This episode throws light on all of these questions and many more.
Ismaili Centre Toronto: Frontiers of Science and Innovation Public Lecture Series Seeing the unseeable by Professor Avery Broderick, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, recounts how the Event Horizon Telescope generates images, why scientists think they have finally seen a black hole, and what it all means. He tells the incredible tale of how a global collaboration of astronomers, physicists, and engineers literally traveled to the ends of the Earth to synthesize a telescope the size of the Earth, the only instrument capable of probing the staggeringly small scales presented by black holes.
This two-part series has been adapted from the Reading for Children Programme. Part 2 is delivered by Rehana Merali, Djemilla Daya, and Gulzar Kanji. It covers how and what to read to early years children. Presented by AKEB UK.
Kenya experienced one of the worst droughts in memory because, critics say, it has cut down its trees. Forests used to cover 30% of the land In pre-colonial times. Now they only occupy 6% of Kenya’s space. Helen and Kenya Mutiso want to teach Kenyans how to grow forests in their own backyard and make money from medicines, skincare products, and dyes. It’s part of a nationwide effort to cover 10% of Kenya’s land with trees. A film by Kevin Njue.
In a value-based conversation with moderator Haseena Jamal, Zainub Verjee will speak about her journey in the arts, highlighting the broad scope of her work. She will touch on a wide range of themes, including the role of art in cultural diplomacy, how art fosters civil society, collaborations in art-science-technology, and the value of art and culture during the pandemic. Zainub is a trailblazer for her generation, and this insightful webinar will explore her four decades of engagement with the arts, both in Canada and internationally.

Showing 1–21 of 134 results